Gamers are saying goodbye to Google’s Stadia as the platform shuts down

Google Chromecast and a Stadia Controller

Google will shut down its Stadia cloud gaming service in the United Kingdom on Thursday while refunding players.

When Stadia launched in November 2019, it was billed as the “Netflix for games,” allowing gamers to watch games online without the need for a PC or console.

The service will be offline in the UK after 8 a.m. on January 19, according to gamers, who are “heartbroken” that it is no longer available.

Google has offered reimbursements to all Stadia purchasers.

This includes customers who purchased controllers, games, or digital material, which Google had previously anticipated would be refunded by mid-January.

Google announced the end of the project with the release of a recent Stadia game, Worm Game, which developers used to test the service prior to its release.

It has also stated that it intends to make its Stadia controllers Bluetooth-enabled, allowing them to be used wirelessly on PCs to play any game even after Stadia has been turned down.

Google said in September that Stadia will be shutting down because it “hadn’t garnered the momentum with users” that the firm had hoped for.

However, fans have responded with regret, with many pointing out that several games made just for Stadia may be lost forever if the service is discontinued.

Splash Damage, the London-based company of the multiplayer game Outcasters, stated last year that the game will not be released elsewhere.

Meanwhile, Q-Games founder and CEO Dylan Cuthbert told BBC News his team spent two years building PixelJunk Raiders specifically for Stadia and he wanted to make sure it wasn’t “gone forever”. .

“It’s a pity when people can’t play a game you’ve been working on for years,” he remarked.

“We’re looking to speak to publishers who can help us get it to PC or possibly PS5 [PlayStation 5] or other platforms. We control the intellectual property, therefore we’re working on a solution.”

Mr Cuthbert stated that he was discussing how this might work with Google, which had been “predictably” thinking about finding a solution. But there is another issue.

“I’d also want to alter the game a little,” he stated.

“We ended up hurrying it a little when we introduced it. I intended to take a little more time – perhaps another eight months or so – to tweak a few things.

“If I wanted to reprint it, I would do that and I would want to find a publisher that could help us with that. But there’s nothing in the books yet.”

Jordy, 30, of Gosport, told BBC News she has three Stadia controllers and is “heartbroken” that they are being shut down.

Mr Cuthbert claimed that he was discussing how this would work with Google, which was “predictably” considering finding a solution. But there’s another problem.

“I’d also like to change the game a little,” he said.

“We ended up rushing it when we launched it. I planned to spend a little more time – perhaps another eight months or so – fine-tuning a few details.

“If I wanted to reissue it, I would do that and I would want to find a publisher that could help us with that. But nothing is on the books yet.”

Jordy, 30, of Gosport, told BBC News that she has three Stadia controllers and is “heartbroken” that they are being decommissioned.

“Loved it”

Dan, 30, from Kent, received his Stadia gear at the start. According to BBC News, it was the first time he had played a game in eight years.

“I chose the Stadia for its ease of use,” he explained. “There were no downloads or updates to be installed… It was there only when you needed it to play a game.

“I probably spent £800 or £900 on games. I recently purchased an Xbox in order to replace it.”

“I thought it was fantastic. It brought me back into playing.”

Some donors requested that their last names not be used.

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